Etiology Of Schizophrenia Essay

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Essay Biological, Social and Psychological Causes of Schizophrenia

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Biological, Social and Psychological Causes of Schizophrenia Schizophrenia is a very serious, long-term disorder that affects about 1% of the world’s population. It affects people anywhere from twenty years old, to forty-five years old. It is known to be one of the most disabling diseases in this age group. Schizophrenia can break down a person’s behaviors, emotions, and thoughts. People who suffer from schizophrenia usually show very inappropriate displays of their actions and feelings. Sufferers have been known to hear voices, even when there is nobody around them. They have problems controlling their thoughts, and sometimes blurt out things that are very inappropriate. This paper will outline the biological, social, and psychological…show more content…

Biological, Social and Psychological Causes of Schizophrenia Schizophrenia is a very serious, long-term disorder that affects about 1% of the world’s population. It affects people anywhere from twenty years old, to forty-five years old. It is known to be one of the most disabling diseases in this age group. Schizophrenia can break down a person’s behaviors, emotions, and thoughts. People who suffer from schizophrenia usually show very inappropriate displays of their actions and feelings. Sufferers have been known to hear voices, even when there is nobody around them. They have problems controlling their thoughts, and sometimes blurt out things that are very inappropriate. This paper will outline the biological, social, and psychological causes of schizophrenia. There is really no known single cause of schizophrenia, but experts have evidence that show environmental factors and genetics play a part in contributing to this disease. Familygenes plays a major part on whether or not a person can have a history of schizophrenia. A person with a family history of schizophrenia has a 10% chance of passing it down, and somebody else suffering from it. A family that does not have any history has less than a 1% chance of passing it down. Studies have also suggested that prenatal difficulties and complications have had a big influence on the development of schizophrenia. Throughout our bodies we have billions of nerve cells. Each nerve cell has to send and receive messages from

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