Examples Of Proposal Argument Essays

Proposal Essay Topics

 

The Proposal Essay is an assignment that requires the student-writer to create a proposal convincing their reader that something is a good idea and that the reader should consider it. These essays prepare students to write for business and economic transactions in the real world, and are generally used in the context of a project, product or investment.

 


Proposal Essays assert an argument and defend it; they define a problem and suggest a remedy, solution or course of action, and include if necessary background information on the subject being expounded on. It is generally composed of five or more paragraphs, each focusing on the Thesis – in this case, the action being proposed to fix the problem: the solution.

 

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List of Topics for a Proposal Essay

 

  • The causes of Global Warming, its consequences, and a solution to it

 

  • Ways to prevent bullying on Social Media, which is very prevalent

 

  • How to tackle the problem of homelessness

 

  • Issues with cyber-crime and how it can be prevented

 

  • Ways to reduce pollution of the ocean

 


 

See also:

 

     Reflective Essay Topics

     Research Essay Topics

     Narrative Essay Topics

     Persuasive Essay topics 

     Definition Essay Topics

 


 

  • How the standard exam is not helping students learn, only how to take a test, and a better solution to this approach, which is not working

 

  • Social inequality and ways to solve the problem: making people more equal in all aspects of society, regardless of race, religious devotion and income

 

  • Ways to tackle the glass ceiling for women in business

 

  • How to get more people voting in elections

 

  • Ways for parents to tackle childhood obesity

 

  • How to combat gun violence, a big problem in the U.S. and other parts of the world

 

  • Approaches to US gun control, and which are the best

 

  • The lack of public-art institutions and how to grow them in communities all around the globe

 

  • How to encourage an active lifestyle, since obesity and other health problems are so ubiquitous in the U.S. and other countries

 

  • How to have equal party representation in government decisions, for federal, state and local operations

 

  • A look at drug addiction and the different ways to prevent it

 

  • Ways to combat high gas prices: commute via bike, public transit, or carpool, etc. and which is best

 

  • Animal poaching and ways to prevent further killings of exotic and rare animals for money

 

  • Combatting childhood obesity by teaching students and parents more about the benefits of good food/nutrition and exercise

 

  • Littering on the streets: giving people tax-break incentives for cleaning communities and neighborhoods

 

  • For teacher improvement, they should be required to travel and do substantial research on the field they are teaching

 

  • The problem with Corruption at the Federal government level and how to prevent it

 

  • To combat heavy immigration into the U.S. from Latin-American countries, give immigrants seasonal visas but with heavy monitoring; or, let them stay in the country, but tax them on what they earn while working in the U.S.

 

  • The rate of high school and college dropouts and how to combat the problem so that people stay in school long enough to graduate

 

  • To combat racism, Hollywood – the movie-making industry that impacts people all over the world – should be made to make a more appropriate, proactive effort to eliminate racial stereotypes and tension between races

 

  • To improve a nation, its people need more education. To do this, college tuition should be affordable for everyone

 

  • The issue of college safety: ways that colleges can be made safer for all students, including those with mental illnesses

 

  • Ways to prevent people from drunk driving, besides increasing jail penalties for those convicted of Driving Under the Influence

 

  • With people becoming increasingly dependent on technology, a solution would be to heavily promote the downfalls of it – how it negatively impacts people’s health, their time and success, etc.

 

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Introductions, Body Paragraphs, and Conclusions for an Argument Paper

Summary:

This resource outlines the generally accepted structure for introductions, body paragraphs, and conclusions in an academic argument paper. Keep in mind that this resource contains guidelines and not strict rules about organization. Your structure needs to be flexible enough to meet the requirements of your purpose and audience.

Contributors: Allen Brizee
Last Edited: 2018-02-09 01:03:40

The following sections outline the generally accepted structure for an academic argument paper. Keep in mind that these are guidelines and that your structure needs to be flexible enough to meet the requirements of your purpose and audience.

You may also use the following Purdue OWL resources to help you with your argument paper:

Introduction

The introduction is the broad beginning of the paper that answers three important questions:

  1. What is this?
  2. Why am I reading it?
  3. What do you want me to do?

You should answer these questions by doing the following:

  1. Set the context –provide general information about the main idea, explaining the situation so the reader can make sense of the topic and the claims you make and support
  2. State why the main idea is important –tell the reader why he or she should care and keep reading. Your goal is to create a compelling, clear, and convincing essay people will want to read and act upon
  3. State your thesis/claim –compose a sentence or two stating the position you will support with logos (sound reasoning: induction, deduction), pathos (balanced emotional appeal), and ethos (author credibility).

For exploratory essays, your primary research question would replace your thesis statement so that the audience understands why you began your inquiry. An overview of the types of sources you explored might follow your research question.

If your argument paper is long, you may want to forecast how you will support your thesis by outlining the structure of your paper, the sources you will consider, and the opposition to your position. You can forecast your paper in many different ways depending on the type of paper you are writing. Your forecast could read something like this:

First, I will define key terms for my argument, and then I will provide some background of the situation. Next, I will outline the important positions of the argument and explain why I support one of these positions. Lastly, I will consider opposing positions and discuss why these positions are outdated. I will conclude with some ideas for taking action and possible directions for future research.

When writing a research paper, you may need to use a more formal, less personal tone. Your forecast might read like this:

This paper begins by providing key terms for the argument before providing background of the situation. Next, important positions are outlined and supported. To provide a more thorough explanation of these important positions, opposing positions are discussed. The paper concludes with some ideas for taking action and possible directions for future research.

Ask your instructor about what tone you should use when providing a forecast for your paper.

These are very general examples, but by adding some details on your specific topic, a forecast will effectively outline the structure of your paper so your readers can more easily follow your ideas.

Thesis checklist

Your thesis is more than a general statement about your main idea. It needs to establish a clear position you will support with balanced proofs (logos, pathos, ethos). Use the checklist below to help you create a thesis.

This section is adapted from Writing with a Thesis: A Rhetoric Reader by David Skwire and Sarah Skwire:

Make sure you avoid the following when creating your thesis:

  • A thesis is not a title: Homes and schools (title) vs. Parents ought to participate more in the education of their children (good thesis).
  • A thesis is not an announcement of the subject: My subject is the incompetence of the Supreme Court vs. The Supreme Court made a mistake when it ruled in favor of George W. Bush in the 2000 election.
  • A thesis is not a statement of absolute fact: Jane Austen is the author of Pride and Prejudice.
  • A thesis is not the whole essay: A thesis is your main idea/claim/refutation/problem-solution expressed in a single sentence or a combination of sentences.
  • Please note that according to the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, Seventh Edition, "A thesis statement is a single sentence that formulates both your topic and your point of view" (Gibaldi 42). However, if your paper is more complex and requires a thesis statement, your thesis may require a combination of sentences.

Make sure you follow these guidelines when creating your thesis:

  • A good thesis is unified:
    • NOT: Detective stories are not a high form of literature, but people have always been fascinated by them, and many fine writers have experimented with them

(floppy). vs.

  •  
    • BETTER: Detective stories appeal to the basic human desire for thrills (concise).

  • A good thesis is specific:
    • NOT: James Joyce’s Ulysses is very good. vs.

    • BETTER: James Joyce’s Ulysses helped create a new way for writers to deal with the unconscious.

  • Try to be as specific as possible (without providing too much detail) when creating your thesis:
    • NOT: James Joyce’s Ulysses helped create a new way for writers to deal with the unconscious. vs.

    • BETTER: James Joyce’s Ulysses helped create a new way for writers to deal with the unconscious by utilizing the findings of Freudian psychology and introducing the techniques of literary stream-of-consciousness.

Quick Checklist:

_____ The thesis/claim follows the guidelines outlined above

_____ The thesis/claim matches the requirements and goals of the assignment

_____ The thesis/claim is clear and easily recognizable

_____ The thesis/claim seems supportable by good reasoning/data, emotional appeal

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