Riley Guide Cover Letters

The Riley Guide: Resumes & Cover Letters

Resumes, Cover Letters,
& Other Job Search Correspondence

Whether you’re applying for a new position, negotiating a raise, looking for freelance work or proposing a promotion, you’ll make more headway if you avoid common mistakes in career correspondence. Even the most ideal candidates and proposals can make a poor impression if they break basic formatting rules, ignore rules of business etiquette or fail to follow the right distribution channels. In this article, we’ll walk you through a variety of business correspondence, pointing out avoidable missteps along the way.

Cover Letters & Other Correspondence

Writing an effective cover letter boils down to two basic principles: Professionalism and personalization. Professionalism mostly consists of following formulas – phrasing your greeting and closing according to the rules, and structuring the letter as a whole in a way that makes your point clear. Personalization, meanwhile, consists of tailoring your letter to include references to specific people and positions, as well as including keywords related to the recipient’s field of work. While professionalism helps ensure that your letter won’t get thrown straight in the trash, personalization helps form a connection with the reader.

Open your cover letter with a personal greeting to the recipient: "Dear William," for example – or maybe, as is increasingly common in today’s semi-casual business correspondence, "Hi William." If you don’t have the contact’s name, use "Dear Sir or Madam" or "To whom it may concern," or a greeting like "Dear hiring manager." The main body of the letter is split into three parts:

The main body of an effective cover letter is split into three parts…
  • A sentence that builds an immediate connection with the reader – for example, the name of the person who referred you, a reference to an aspect of the company that inspired you to reach out to them
  • A very brief pitch, which may be a description of the skills you can bring to the company, or a mention of the proposal or project you’re including with the letter
  • An explanation of what you expect the next step to be – such as a follow-up meeting or a phone call
Effective cover letters often consist of just three sentences, and almost all of them run under a paragraph in length. The point is to make an impact by using those sentences to maximum effect. If you don’t know much about the company’s current mission or goals, spend a few minutes on Google (and/or talking with your professional contacts) and dig up some info about its situation that you can work into your letter. And of course, if you’re replying to a job listing, make sure your letter repeats keywords and phrases from the advertisement. After that close out with a "Warm regards" or a similar phrase, then sign your name below – and you’ll be all set.

Thank you letters can serve as a handy way to keep the lines of communication open after a job interview – successful or otherwise – a meeting or just a conversation at a tradeshow. They send a message of respect to the recipient, and also help keep you in his or her thoughts, which may turn out to be important for your career in ways you don’t even expect right now. Like cover letters, thank you letters consist of three main parts:

  • A statement of thanks for the interview, offer, etc.
  • An explanation of your current thoughts about this stage of the process – for example, that you’re confident you can help with a certain situation
  • A reference to the expected next step in the process, such as a meeting or deliverable
A thank you letter doesn’t have to be as formal as a cover letter – though it can be, if necessary – and its purpose doesn’t always have to be as clear-cut, either. A large part of networking is simply maintaining open-ended conversations and fostering general goodwill – so don’t be shy about letting your professional contacts know that you’re thinking of them in a positive light.
Goodbye letters can help make sure your departure from a company goes smoothly…

Letters also form crucial parts of the departure process from any job. Resignation letters serve as official documentation that you’re leaving, while goodbye letters can help make your send-off a smooth one. Your resignation letter only needs to be a few sentences long: Just state the position from which you’re resigning and the date you’ll be leaving. It’s also customary to include a few words of thanks toward the employer, regardless of how you actually feel at this point. A goodbye letter, on the other hand, is less formal – just an explanation of when you’ll be leaving, what your current plans are, and how you can be reached once you’ve left.

Declining a Job Offer

There are lots of potential reasons to turn down a job offer – salary and relocation being two of the most common – and following your instincts may be the best decision you can make, regardless of the current state of your job market. Getting stuck in a bad job is really just a waste of time – time you could’ve spent looking for a position that meets your needs better. So even if you don’t have a better offer on the table right now, declining an unsatisfactory offer is a decision you’ll rarely regret as much as a decision to accept an unsatisfactory job.

Keep your declination short, sweet and to-the-point…

When you decline the offer, there’s no need to mention your reasons, no matter how ridiculous the salary offer or recommendation requirements may have been. Some career coaches recommend sending your declination in letter form, while others advocate declining over the phone or in person. Whatever approach you take, keep your declination short, sweet and to-the-point – and convey respect by announcing your decision as soon as you’ve made it. You never know who the employer’s professional contacts may be, or under what future circumstances you might run into the person who made the offer.

Writing a Proposal

If you’re ready to launch a new project or move up the company ladder, a written proposal often forms a critical part of the pitch process. As long as you’ve got a solid track record with the company, the process ought to go pretty smoothly – whether you get a "yes" or a "no" – as long as you craft your proposal professionally and make a strong case for your idea. The professionalism is the easy part – it just consists of following a few rules – while the strong case part is largely up to you. Still, this section’s got some tips on both aspects.

Before you start making your proposal, gather support both from colleagues and from hard facts…

No matter what kind of proposal you’re planning on making, it’s always a good idea to gather support – or at least test the waters with your company’s decision-makers – before you start putting in the hours on the proposal itself. Keep these conversations informal – you don’t want to seem as though you’re going over anyone’s head – but be sure to make it clear how your proposal would help each person with whom you chat. You’ll also want to do some background research on similar positions or proposals – for example, asking colleagues whether this kind of attempt has worked in the past, doing some statistical research on sites like BLS.gov (the official website of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics), or asking professionals in your network how successful people have approached projects like yours.

Good timing is crucial in any request for a raise or promotion…

A request for a raise or promotion is one of the most straightforward types of proposals. Nerve-wracking as it may be, it usually only takes one or two conversations to find out whether it’s possible or not – and you can do most of your background research online, by looking up salaries for other workers at your level, in your field and in your geographical area. Timing, however, is crucial in a request for a raise. Make the request when the company’s just had a strong quarter, and you’ll stand a much better chance than if the moment you seize is a moment of company crisis. And if you’ve just completed an impressive project, all the better.

Proposing a new position can be trickier, but it’s not all that unusual, especially at larger companies. As with any employer negotiation, it’ll help to framing your proposal in terms of the company’s needs and financial situation. Emphasize how many hours, and how much money, could be saved by putting a person in the role you suggest – although, for obvious reasons, you won’t want to suggest that your current position could easily be eliminated. Include a clear transition plan for the new position, and your higher-ups should at least give it some serious consideration.

Submitting Writing Samples to Employers

At some point in the interview process, a prospective employer may ask you to submit a sample of your writing. The reason for this varies depending on the type of job in question – some employers may simply want to make sure that you’ve got a solid grasp of basic grammar and spelling, while others may be testing your typing skills. In fields like journalism and copywriting, many employers ask for samples of your previous published work, and may also ask you to compose a short off-the-cuff essay on a topic of their choice.

You’ll make a positive impression with your writing sample as long as it’s free of basic mistakes…

As long as you’ve got no major problems with basic typing, grammar and spelling- and, if you’re applying for a writing-oriented job, with prose and paragraph structure – you shouldn’t have any problems making a positive impression with your writing sample. Most employers are looking for a sample 500 words or under, and will be satisfied with the result as long as it’s free from errors in spelling and sentence structure.

If you’re given your own choice of topics, you’ll want to choose one that demonstrates your understanding of the type of work you’d be doing if you’re hired – for example, if it’s a job in a legal field, focus on presenting law-related ideas as clearly as possible. At the same time, feel free to inject a little of your personality into the writing sample, and even throw in some humor if appropriate. Don’t forget to use at least one or two specific examples of the idea you’re describing, which will help make your writing more memorable. And overall, be sure your writing is structured and concise: Bring up an idea, cite some arguments and examples, then finish up by recapping your main point.

References & Recommendations

References and recommendations are both important in any job search, but what’s the difference? References are more traditional – for example, a former supervisor who agrees to be listed on your resume, and chat about you in a positive light with any interviewers who call. Recommendations, on the other hand, are a little more in-depth – they tend to come from people like academic advisors and mentors, who’ve worked with you closely over a long period of time and can speak from experience about things like your moral character and your expertise in your field.

References and recommendations are both important, and there are differences between them…

It’s always advisable to ask your references’ permission before listing them on your resume, and many career coaches also recommend coaching them a little, so they have some idea of which of your traits you’re hoping they’ll emphasize to prospective employers. It’s also worthwhile to cultivate extra goodwill with anyone you plan on using as a reference at any point in your career – which is a process that begins early in a professional relationship and continues for many years. After all, a person who talks to you on a semi-regular basis – even if it’s just friendly chatting – is much more likely to summon genuine enthusiasm than someone who hardly knows you.

A solid base of references, though, also reaches onto the Internet these days, in the form of your profiles on social media websites – most of which your prospective employer is likely to investigate. You don’t necessarily have to promote your professional skills on every social network, but it’s still your responsibility to manage your online reputation – even if it’s just to privatize access to certain information and photos.

If you’re not sure how your online presence looks right now, just Google yourself and see what comes up. You’ll also want to update your social media profiles with a current photo, and make especially sure that any career-related info on sites like LinkedIn is up-to-date and accurate. Many employers Google all their potential hires, and the practice is becoming more common all the time – so if you take your job search seriously, it’s well worth your while to tighten up your online persona.

Requirements on Disclosing Salary

Getting request to discuss your previous salaries can feel like one of the most awkward parts of a job interview – especially if you’re asking for a significantly higher salary. And although there’s no law requiring you to reveal your previous salaries to a prospective employer, it can hurt your chances in the running for a position. Even so, a lot of career coaches strongly advise politely refusing a requ st to discuss your previous salaries, for three main reasons:

  • It’s personal and confidential information.
  • Previous salaries don’t determine your current value as an employee.
  • Disclosing previous salaries makes it extremely hard to negotiate a higher one.
Any properly prepared resume should contain keywords for grabbing the employer’s attention…

Another option is to gracefully dodge the question by saying something like, "Well, I know that people in this type of position, in this city, typically make around $40,000 per year." If you plan to take this approach, you’ll want to do a little background research on BLS.gov, the website of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, which includes a user-friendly search engine to help you track down salary info for hundreds of fields. And yet another possibility is to reveal some of your previous salaries strategically, in a way that demonstrates upward progress – implying that you expect that trend to continue with this job.

No matter which of the above approaches you plan to take, though, you can save yourself stress by spending a little time considering in advance what you’ll do if the employer just won’t take no for an answer. Is this particular job worth the risk to you? That’s something you’ll have to determine on a case-by-case basis.

Help With Your Resume and CV

An effective modern resume isn’t just a list of previous positions and skills – it’s a dynamic document that adapts to the purposes and requirements of a variety of distribution channels, as well as to the expectations and desires of prospective employers. Most resumes get tossed in the trash can – physical or digital – within seconds, so you’ll be doing yourself a favor if you take some time to distinguish yours from the competition.

Start by developing a "core resume," which is basically a traditional resume: Your contact info at the top, a list of previous positions you’ve held, and a summary of your competencies and special skills. But this is just the start – the next step is to use this document as a base from which to develop versions tailored for specific employers and job openings. This isn’t actually all that tricky – it mostly amounts to three types of tweaks:

  • Trimming your employment history down to positions relevant to the work you’re applying for
  • Changing the wording to emphasize the relevant aspects of your work at those positions
  • Throwing in some keywords from the job posting and/or the employer’s website
Three simple tweaks can tailor your resume to catch the eyes of specific employers…

Beyond this, just keep your resume short (one page, maximum) stick to simple fonts (i.e., Arial or Times New Roman), and focus on particular numbers as much as possible – for example, "28 percent improvement in efficiency" or "processed 500 documents per day." And while it might seem obvious to point out that your resume should be 100 percent free of spelling and grammar mistakes, many hiring managers say they receive resumes with these errors on a daily basis – so don’t forget to spell-check and proofread carefully.

A word to the wise, by the way: Quite a few people think they can get away with fudging some of the details on their resumes – but this carries more of a risk than you might think. According to the 2004 Reference and Background Checking Survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), 96 percent of all organizations check up on the backgrounds and references of prospective hires, and nearly 50 percent of those organizations reported that those check-ups found inconsistencies in dates of previous employment, criminal records, former job titles and past salaries. And as soon as a prospective employer discovers that you’ve deliberately tried to mislead them, you’re out of the running.

Three simple tweaks can tailor your resume to catch the eyes of specific employers…

Two things you don’t need to worry about disclosing in detail on your resume, though, are your legal right-to-work info and any security clearances you happen to have. Employers will request these things anyway, if they need, to know about them, at some point in the interview process – and many career coaches recommend against listing it in public resume databases. If a job posting specifically asks for info on your security clearance, it’s entirely reasonable to simply say "yes" (if you have it) in your initial resume and application, then talk through the details later in the process. And as far as right-to-work goes, it’s enough to say that you’re a citizen of the United States, or name the work visa you have.

Preparing Your Resume for Online Posting

Adapting your resume for specific employers is one part of the process, but it’s also worth your while to prepare a few versions for various channels of distribution. Since you’ll probably only use paper resumes for in-person meetings and interviews, you’ll also want to prepare copies in Portable Document Format (PDF), which preserves all formatting and fonts exactly as they appeared on your screen – in Microsoft Word format (.doc), which is preferred by many employers, and in plain text format, which will come in handy for submitting through text-only forms on online job boards.

Any properly prepared resume should contain keywords for grabbing the employer’s attention…

When submitting your resume via email, be sure to choose a subject line that’s clear about the reason for the email – for example, "Legal Assistant Applying for Chicago Paralegal Position." Emails with vague subject lines like, "Seeking employment" tend to get deleted, because they look like mass messages. Treat the body of the email like a cover letter, and follow the tips in the first section of this article to make sure it grabs the employer’s attention. And, as described in the section above, be sure to throw in plenty of keywords related to the job posting in question.

A surprising number of people don’t read many job postings in full, which means they often miss information that directly results in the trashing of their resumes. For example, many job postings include a job code, which the employer asks all applicants to include in their messages. Other employers may simply include odd little requests – for example, "Please include your favorite color in your message" – to help save time by filtering out applicants who aren’t detail-oriented enough to read the post in full. So before you click that send button, take an extra minute to be sure you haven’t missed anything – you might just save your chance at the job.

Read job postings in full, because the employer may have specific requests about what to include…

Sharing your resume online does mean exposing yourself to a certain amount of public scrutiny – but many job board sites allow you to control how much of your information gets shared. Some sites, like LinkedIn, are even designed around internal communication systems that allow members to communicate without sharing any personal info at all, if they’d rather not. Some job seekers prefer to set up email addresses just for the current job search, and some even remove all company details from their resumes, opting instead to substitute terms like "a small local construction firm" or "a Fortune 500 banking company."

The level of online privacy you’ll need to opt for depends on your employment situation – for example, you might be concerned that your current boss will stumble on your resume, in which case you’ll want to err on the side of caution – and however much (or however little) you want to share about yourself, you can find at least one website that’ll let you share to that degree, and no further.

Many job search websites earn side income by selling members’ info to advertisers…

Take a little time to investigate each site where you’re considering posting your resume – you’ll probably want to post your resume on one or two of the largest broad-based job boards, along with one or two sites dedicated to your own particular niche or field. Read over the privacy policies of any sites to which you’re considering signing up, because many job search websites earn a little side income by selling members’ info to advertisers. And avoid sites that require you to enter any personal info just to take a look at listings. Any legitimate site will at least allow you to browse without registering, even if access to employers’ actual contact info is members-only.

And once your job search is over – or you’re tired of looking for jobs on a particular site – be sure to delete your resume from the database. It can be easy to lose track of all the places you’ve posted your resume, and if a future employer finds a stray resume you’ve left online, you may be called in for an uncomfortable conversation. Plus, it’s hard to predict who else may find that info eventually, especially if a site where you’ve posted your resume changes its privacy policy someday. So stay safe and clear out any leftovers when you’re done.

Resume Databases and Distribution Services

You may be tempted to supplement your job search with a resume distribution service – also sometimes known as a "resume-blasting" service, which sends your resume to hundreds or thousands of potential employers in return for a fee. While this might seem like a powerful tactic, many career coaches advise against it for a variety of reasons. For one thing, these services don’t always make it clear where they get the thousands of email addresses to which they submit resumes – and some of them spam resumes to employers who haven’t signed up for their lists.

Many career coaches advise against using these services, for a variety of reasons…

Some resume-blasting services aren’t exactly clear about what they promise in return for your money, either. Just because they blast your resume to thousands of email addresses doesn’t mean those addresses are all regularly checked, or that the people on the other ends of them are empowered to make hiring decisions. Take a few minutes to investigate any service you’re considering with the Better Business Bureau and with RipOffReport.com – and plug their name into Google, too, to see what others are saying about them.

Although this scattershot approach to self-marketing isn’t as likely to be effective as some old-fashioned in-person networking – quality, as usual, tends to yield richer results than sheer quantity does. Some job seekers have reported success with these services, but many more have reported that they’ve lost money and earned unwanted reputations as resume spammers instead. But if you decide it’s worth those risks, just make sure you get a written guarantee of the promised results, and pay with a credit card (not a debit card) so you can dispute the charges with your card company if you have to.

Helpful links

Cover Letter Guides — Complete guide to many aspects of cover letters, packed with specific examples.

Managing Your References — All kinds of tips on choosing your references, and on making the most of them.

Susan Ireland’s Resume Site — How-to articles, examples, and lots of other resources for resume writing.

The Riley Guide: Resumes & Cover Letters or
How to Job Search

Prepare Your Resume for Email
and Online Posting


The Internet-Ready Resume

Many people still think the resume you put online is not the same document that you created to print out and mail to prospective employers or hand to interviewers. This is untrue. You do not need a different resume, you only need to alter the format of your resume to make it easy for you to post, copy and paste, or email it to employers.

When done correctly, your well-written, well-prepared resume will contain all of the necessary keywords to attract attention whether it is being scanned into a resume system, indexed and searched online, or read on paper by a real human.

Resume Versions to Prepare

Job search experts recommend you keep duplicates of your resume in each of these versions or formats.
  1. A Print Version, designed with bulleted lists, italicized text, and other highlights, ready to print and mail or hand to potential contacts and interviewers.
  2. A Scannable Version, a less-designed version without the fancy design highlights. Bulleted lists are fine, but that’s about the limit.
  3. A Plain Text Version, a plain text file ready to copy and paste into online forms or post in online resume databases. This might also be referred to as a Text-Only copy.
  4. An E-mail Version, another plain text copy, but this one is specifically formatted for the length-of-line restrictions in e-mail. This is also a Text-Only copy.
This is the same document presented in four ways, each formatted for a specific delivery purpose.

Why Plain Text?

You could just use the forms most databases provide to build your resume in their system, but resume expert and author Susan Ireland doesn’t recommend you do this for several reasons.
  1. Spell-check: Preparing your resume in advance using your own word processing program allows you to spell-check your resume and revise it as needed until you are happy with it.
  2. Format: Most online forms and builders insist on a chronological resume, which focuses on work history. Career changers who would prefer a functional resume with its emphasis on skills will be at a disadvantage.
  3. Reusability: If you build it in their database using their form, you’ve done a lot of work for only one site, which means you will have to repeat your effort for every database you encounter. That’s a lot of typing! Prepare it in advance on your own computer and you have it to use as much as you like.

We have instructions on converting your Word document to 2 different Plain Text documents suitable for pasting in to email and posting in databases.

What About an HTML Version?

Many job seekers are creating "webbed" resumes in the hopes of being discovered or as a place to refer an employer who might want to see more than what is usually found in a resume. An HTML version of your resume works particularly well for persons in the visual arts or programming, but it could serve anyone, provided it is done right and for the right reasons.
  • Doing it right means starting with a basic HTML version of your designed resume, not an overloaded page of Shockwave and Java effects, huge graphics, and audio files that takes more than 2 minutes to download on your DSL line and blasts out your computer speakers.
  • Doing it for the right reasons means turning your resume into a portfolio, complete with links to former employers or projects already publicly available online. Be sure you are not violating any copyright or confidentiality clauses by putting information online without prior approval.
The biggest problem with HTML resumes is TMI – "too much information". Many people make their resumes part of their personal web site, loading it where there is all kinds of information an employer does not need to know before you are hired, like your marital status, ethnic background, religious affiliations, personal interests, past or present health problems, and much more. Allowing an employer to learn so much about you can lead to potential discrimination problems that you may never be aware of for the way you look, your political or religious beliefs or any number of other reasons.
I know some career management professionals advocate the use of photos plus personal biographies for executive clients, stating this is the same information you would find in an executive bio released by the company for publicity purposes. However, I still urge job seekers to be both conservative and conscientious about what you are telling prospective employers before you actually get called into an interview.

Always remember, your resume presents the image you want employers to see. For this reason, it is important that you keep your presence entirely professional, never linking your resume to any personal information. If you decide to add an HTML resume to your campaign, post it in a location separate from your personal web site, and do not link between the two.

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Rules for Responding Online

The fastest way to respond to Internet job listings is to e-mail your cover letter and resume to the person or organization indicated. However, there are some simple rules to follow before hitting the "send" key.
Look at it this way. You have 15 or 20 seconds to get someone’s attention using email. In that time, you must convince the recipient to
  • open your email
  • read your message
  • not delete your email
Do it wrong, get into the wrong mail box, or make someone’s job harder, and the best resume in the world from the most qualified person in the world will be trashed.
Getting your email opened, read, and actually considered really comes down to some simple rules.
  1. Use the right Subject. "Seeking employment" is not an acceptable subject. If you are responding to an advertisement, use the job title or job code cited in the advertisement to make it easy for your e-mail to be recognized and routed to the appropriate person. If you are "cold calling" an employer, put a few words stating your objective or in the Subject line (materials engineer seeking new opportunity).
  2. Include a cover letter in your email and address it to the recipient. "Here’s my resume, please tell me if you have any jobs I might fill" is not a cover letter and does not encourage anyone to look at your resume. Whether or not you are responding to an advertised opening, the cover letter will introduce you, specify how you meet the needs of the employer, and will encourage the recipient to read your full resume.
  3. Always send your resume in the body of the e-mail message, not as an attachment. Force someone to open an attachment just to get to know you and your 20 seconds are over before they even start. Put that resume right in the message so the recipient will see it as soon as he or she opens the message. This technique also helps you get through e-mail systems that reject all attachments in this day of rampant computer viruses.
  4. Make sure your resume is properly formatted for e-mail. Plain text resumes not formatted for email can be unreadable, and unreadable resumes will most likely be deleted. Take the time to make sure it will look as good on all computers and in all email systems as it does on your screen. This means shorter text lines, spacing between sections, and text-based highlights.
  5. If responding to an advertisement, read the application instructions and follow them. Failing to follow application instructions not only delays your resume, it labels you as someone who doesn’t take direction well. It’s the Trash bin for you. They might specify an email address and job code to use. They might even actually ask you to send your resume as a Word attachment. Whatever they want, you do.
Always remember: It only takes a second for someone to delete an e-mail message. Don’t give them a reason to trash you! Think before you respond!

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Posting your Resume: Placement vs. Privacy

Staying Cyber-Safe

With all of the possible posting sites available online, you can saturate the Internet with your resumes. Is this a good thing? There are two issues to consider when posting your resume online.

  1. Placement: where should you post it?
  2. Privacy: how public do you want it to be?
What’s the problem? The more exposure you get, the better, right? Not necessarily.
Recruiters get tired of finding the same resumes for the same people in every database they search. If you get labeled a "resume spammer," you won’t be considered for job openings they are working to fill. Also, the farther your resume spreads, the less control you have over it and the more likely it is to be discovered by someone you had hoped wouldn’t see it, like your current employer. And yes, people do get fired.

Some problems can be avoided by merely limiting where you post your resume (Placement), others by limiting the information in your posted resume (Privacy), but the two issues must be addressed hand-in-hand. It is possible to be visible but private online, but how visible you want to be vs. how comfortable you are in public is a question only you can answer.

Staying Cyber-Safe

Limiting your posting is a good way to protect your privacy, but it is also important to select those few sites with care. Susan Joyce, author of Job-Hunt.org, encourages job seekers to carefully evaluate the job sites used and to be aware of the information presented in the resume. The following tips include information excerpted from her articles on Choosing a Job Site and Your Cyber-Safe Resume. This information was used with her permission. I highly recommend a visit to her site to read the full articles.
  1. Limit where you post. Post your resume in the databases of only one or two large popular job sites. At the same time, post it in the databases of one or two smaller job sites targeted to your specific industry, occupational group, or geographic location. This will give you both "maximum exposure" (many employers crossing industries and regions) and "targeted exposure" (employers looking for a smaller yet more highly qualified candidate pool.)
  2. Read Privacy Policies. Note what personal or "individually identifiable" information they will collect, how it may be handled, and whether or not they reserve the right to sell it. Some sites are good and promise to never sell your info, but others reserve the right to sell your personally identifiable information to third parties.
  3. Avoid sites that force you to register a full profile (i.e., your resume) before you can do any search of the job database. You should be allowed to evaluate a site to make sure it’s a good fit to you before adding your information to their database.
  4. Avoid sites that offer to "blast" your resume. Such wide distribution may offer little, if any, control on where a copy of your resume could end up.
  5. Limit access to your personal contact information. Options range from blocking access to just the contact information to keeping your resume completely out of the database searched by employers. Choose the option that works best for you. Remember that if you go for full confidentiality, it may be up to you to remember to delete contact info from your resume. Many job seekers trip up here because they fill out a form with their contact info, then cut and paste the whole resume into the box, forgetting about the contact info here. The database’s protection of your contact info only refers to what you put in the form, not in the box.
  6. Modify the contact information you put on your resume. Remove all standard "contact information" — name, address, phone numbers — and replace your personal e-mail address with an e-mail address set up specifically for your job search. This is where those services like Yahoo! email come into play. Make sure you use an appropriate e-mail name like MEngineer@Yahoo.com. Names like "JustLooking@Yahoo.com" or "DumbBlond@HotMail.com" are not good names for serious job seekers.
  7. Modify your employment history. Remove all dates from your resume. Then, remove the names of all employers and replace them with accurate but generic descriptions. "Nuts n’ Bolts Distributors, Inc." becomes "a small construction supplies distribution company" and "IBM" becomes "a multinational information technology company." If your job title is unique, replace it with an accurate but generic title, so "New England Regional Gadget Marketing Director" becomes "multi-state marketing manager of gadget-class products."
  8. Don’t let your resume sit there. Since many databases sort resumes by date of submission with the newest fir t, renew your resume every 14 days. If you don’t get any response to your resume within 45 days of posting, remove it from that location and post it elsewhere. It could be that employers are not looking for people with your skills in this particular database, but it could also be that there is too much competition between candidates with the same skills and your resume is not rising to the top.
  9. When your job search is over, delete all resumes out there. Do not continue to "dangle the hook" and see what offers may come up. Your new employer may find you still fishing and demand an explanation. Some people are adding a "posted DATE" on the bottom of resumes they register online, but you will still have a tremendous amount of explaining to do if your resume is found to still be circulating. Whether or not you were planning a fast exit, you may find yourself on the way out the door.

Always remember that most job sites make their money by selling access to the resume database! Many want you to post your resume in their database, but few really work for you. When it comes to posting your resume, You Rule. Be choosy.

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Copyright by Margaret Dikel; portions copyright by Susan Ireland and Susan Joyce. Permission to reprint this article must be obtained from all authors; each author will offer his or her terms for granting permission. Please read the complete copyright statement for additional information.

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