Creative Writing Slaughterhouse-Five Essay

Like Vonnegut, who speaks in his own voice in several places to confirm that much of the novel is based on his wartime experiences, Billy Pilgrim lives through the firebombing of Dresden during World War II. From the beginning of the book, war is presented as both comically and horrifyingly absurd. Billy and his comrades, American and German, are ludicrously inept as soldiers. As the subtitle of the novel indicates, they are children on a gamelike crusade, manipulated by inscrutable forces.

Yet the game is deadly: The destruction of Dresden, a city of no strategic importance, populated only by Germans too old or weak to fight and prisoners of war such as Billy, is senseless but inevitable. Because of the shock of this event, Billy becomes a perpetual prisoner of war, returning again and again in his mind to this scene. Vonnegut’s message is especially powerful as he reminds the reader that the destruction of Dresden is no isolated occurrence: Slaughterhouse-Five was written during the Vietnam War era and alludes frequently to a new generation of Billy Pilgrims and Children’s Crusades.

More than simply a war novel--or, more precisely an antiwar novel--Slaughterhouse-Five is a captivating science fiction story. Scenes from World War II alternate with Billy’s life on exhibition in a kind of zoo on the distant planet Tralfamadore. What little solace or pleasure Billy experiences comes at the hands of the Tralfamadorians, whose calmly fatalistic philosophy seems wise when compared to normal human stupidity and irrationality.

Vonnegut’s style is disjointed and the novel is composed of short vignettes and fragments rather than a fully developed sequential narrative, but this style is purposely unsettling and helps Vonnegut accomplish several key objectives. Billy Pilgrim’s time traveling, his habit of jumping quickly from present to past to future as if they were all simultaneously existing moments, makes him seem odd, even crazy, at first glance. But as the novel progresses, the reader acknowledges more and more that this is the natural way the human mind works. Everyone daydreams, remembers, and fantasizes, and these activities become especially important when a person lives in a world that is highly in need of such imaginative remaking.

Bibliography

Giannone, Richard. Vonnegut: A Preface to His Novels. Port Washington, N.Y.: Kennikat Press, 1977. Astute reading of Slaughterhouse-Five, marking the biblical references and Vonnegut’s personal testimony. Devotes similar attention to other novels by Vonnegut.

Klinkowitz, Jerome. Kurt Vonnegut. New York: Methuen, 1982. Explains Slaughterhouse-Five as one of Vonnegut’s “personal” novels, as opposed to the earlier ones that adhere to the stricter forms of science fiction. Draws correlations among the Vonnegut novels.

Klinkowitz, Jerome. Slaughterhouse-Five: Reforming the Novel and the World. Boston: Twayne, 1990. A complete study of the novel. Criticism is taken from sources that reviewed Slaughterhouse-Five when it was published. Numerous passages of Slaughterhouse-Five are explained in depth, as well as Vonnegut’s philosophy as it was seen by the reviewers of his time.

Mayo, Clark. Kurt Vonnegut: The Gospel from Outer Space (or, Yes We Have No Nirvanas). San Bernardino, Calif.: Borgo Press, 1977. A short book with considerable insights into Slaughterhouse-Five and other novels by Vonnegut. The wit, sarcasm, and style of Vonnegut is prominent in the writing of this text.

Schatt, Stanley. Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. Boston: Twayne, 1976. Explores the construction, plot, and structure of Slaughterhouse-Five and considers Vonnegut’s sense of aesthetic distance from the work. Chapters include the contribution of Slaughterhouse-Five to the genre of science fiction and the Tralfamadorian philosophy.

Kurt Vonnegut's "Slaughterhouse Five" A Masterpiece Of Modern Writing

Once in a while, literary work is created that stirs up many minds, seems to never go away. Those books usually speak out about something that is deeply rooted in society; Evil, they speak out against it. One of those works is Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut. It is a masterpiece of modern writing. As the story in the book unravels, there are several recurrent themes, stated through a variety of literary techniques.

The most striking theme is self-righteousness versus evil. Amazingly enough, Vonnegut, reveals self-righteousness as a force for evil. In the name of justice, a glorious end to a war, man commits injustice; bombing of Dresden. By the same means the author uses the feeling of nationalism. Nationalism makes people blind to their faults, and emphasizes 'Others' shortcomings. War quickly reduced a self-righteous nation to the moral level of the enemy, and yet it stayed justified. War makes it difficult for a human being to achieve it's fullest potential. That is the nature of war. It turns humans into passive, conforming sheep that lose their humanity to do justice for their nation.

It is difficult to write about war. Most modern literature tends to glorify it. That action is not intended, it simply happens through direct approach to the facts that today's drama requires. Vonnegut, through his chaotic, indirect approach, shows the other nature of war, the not so glorious one. Even Vonnegut once said; Art must represent not the results, but the process, in order to represent the situation better.

Vonnegut transfers the horror of the war to the reader through the confusion of the main character; Billy Pilgrim. Billy seems to travel in time, or the 'objective time'. The novel presents that mechanical time as only one weight of measure, it totally shuts out the idea of multi- dimensional free flowing time only adding confusion to Billy, and in turn, the reader. All this confusion leads Billy to deny his own nature, individuality. He becomes an unfulfilled person, always searching, mislead. That's just another effect of war that Vonnegut conveys to the reader.

The author tells the story by adapting a double point of view. He tells the story, never letting the reader forget that some of the book is based on his own war experiences. It allows him to tell the reader things that characters can not possibly know, without neccasirly being involved in the action. Vonnegut presents his material in a series of seemingly unconnected images.It requires the reader to fill in the gaps on his own. Vonnegut warns on the front page of the novel, that this book is composed in a 'telegraphic, schizophrenic manner'. He knows that for an average human mind, not to see a connection between realities may be just that. All the time however, he requires the reader to simply think, connect,...

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